Archive for novembre 2010

I migliori libri inglesi del 2010: The Guardian

29 novembre 2010

I migliori libri dell’anno:2010. Articolo pubblicato da Guardian.co.uk.

Best books of the year: 2010

How many picked Jonathan Franzen? And who’s the only one to recommend Tony Blair’s autobiography? Writers and public figures tell the Observer about their favourite books of 2010

    Sam Mendes
    Director

    Jonathan Franzen, Freedom Buy it

    Jonathan Franzen‘s Freedom (Fourth Estate) was head and shoulders above any other book this year: moving, funny, and unexpectedly beautiful. I missed it when it was over. Stephen Sondheim’s Finishing the Hat (Virgin) was like its author: fascinating, precise, opinionated, brilliant. I loved Stewart Lee’s How I Escaped My Certain Fate (Faber). Never has anyone made me feel so close to the terrifying and occasionally exhilarating insanity that is stand-up comedy.

    Sebastian Faulks
    Novelist

    I enjoyed – if that can be the word – The Big Short by Michael Lewis (Allen Lane), an account of how a group of people contrived to bring the banking system to its knees, to take much of your money and many of your jobs, to condemn your children to a life of debt – and got away unpunished, with millions in their own back pockets. It’s in the interest of bankers to pretend that their work is too technical for lay people to follow, but in an account such as Michael Lewis’s, it’s really not that difficult. It’s quite clear what they did. Harder to understand is how they got away with it.

    Rachel Johnson
    Editor, the Lady

    Christopher Hitchens, Hitch 22: A Memoir Buy it

    Hitch-22 (Atlantic) by Christopher Hitchens is like a tin of Pedigree Chum: solid, meaty nourishment. Hitchens is incapable of writing a boring sentence. When he asks himself what he’d like to be different if he had to be the Hitch all over again, he answers: “more money, an even sturdier penis, slightly different parents, a briefer latency period”. I cried several times during Deborah Devonshire’s memoir Wait for Me! (John Murray), mainly at deaths: sister Nancy, brother Tom, and her three stillborn children. The calibre of events, cast and author could hardly be higher and Debo has gracefully potted an extraordinary life (though ordinary to her) with kindness and humour.

    Tristram Hunt
    Historian and politician

    Putting his little local difficulty behind him, Orlando Figes showed in Crimea: The Last Crusade (Allen Lane) why he is such a stellar historian. As ever, it mixes strong narrative pace, a grand canvas and compelling ideas about current geopolitical tensions. In The Lost City of Stoke-on-Trent (Frances Lincoln), Matthew Rice, partner to top potter Emma Bridgewater, provides a clarion call to the “Five Towns” to stop knocking down the bottle kilns and pot banks and start preserving one of the civic gems of England. New Labour never had much time for history, but since the end of office, you can’t stop them writing the stuff. Peter Mandelson’s The Third Man (HarperPress) has the most authentic feel in a genuine account of his role in, out, in, out and in government.

    Jeremy Hunt
    Culture secretary

    Tony Blair, A Journey Buy it

    When I fought the last election I never imagined I would be in cabinet with Nick Clegg – and certainly never thought I would be recommending Tony Blair’s A Journey (Hutchinson). But he has done politicians a favour by reinventing the art of the memoir in a way not achieved since Alan Clark’s Diaries. Funny and self-deprecating, they are also deeply manipulative beneath the surface. His best advice to ministers? Don’t make enemies deliberately as you’ll make plenty accidentally.

    Wendy Cope
    Poet

    I once tried to write a prose memoir but couldn’t find the right tone of voice. Three authors who did published books this year. Hitch-22 by Christopher Hitchens (Atlantic), Red Dust Road by Jackie Kay (Picador), and My Father’s Fortune: A Life by Michael Frayn (Faber) are all beautifully written. On my summer holiday I was surprised to find myself enjoying a fat book about the Soviet economy. Francis Spufford’s Red Plenty (Faber) mixes fact and fiction, with the benefit of scrupulous notes to tell the reader which is which. Without the notes I would have found it frustrating. With them it’s terrific.

    Shami Chakrabarti
    Civil rights campaigner

    Dispatches from the Dark Side Buy it

    Gareth Peirce is such a private person that despite a momentous career (representing the Birmingham Six, Lockerbie families and Guantánamo detainees among others), Dispatches from the Dark Side (Verso) is her first book. It is a timely reminder of the darker side of lawlessness in freedom’s name. The End of the Party by Andrew Rawnsley (Penguin) is an impartial journalistic examination of New Labour by one of Britain’s finest political commentators.

    Craig Raine
    Poet and critic

    Hampton on Hampton (Faber) is a series of interviews with the playwright and screenwriter Christopher Hampton that amounts to an artistic autobiography. Intellectually intimate, unpretentious, informative, entertaining, anecdotal, fearless, funny, serious. Simon Armitage, the best poet of his generation, has produced a book of prose-poems, Seeing Stars (Faber), full of compelling, quirky, inventive, surreal tales. In January, I read his incomparable translation of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. This autumn, I was charmed by the comedy of these spellbinding dispatches.

    Michael Palin
    Broadcaster

    Alain de Botton, A Week at the Airport: A Heathrow Diary Buy it

    I enjoyed Chef by Jaspreet Singh (Bloomsbury). Its themes of food and war and love and poetry form a series of intricate tightropes that the author treads skilfully, bringing us, in a short book, a lot of pleasures. I read Alain de Botton’s A Week at the Airport (Profile) with smiles of recognition, nods of approval and sighs of admiration. Most people can’t wait to get away from airports. I’m very glad he stayed.

    AC                                                            LibOn.it

Le italiane, a cura del telefono rosa

26 novembre 2010

Le italiane, curato da Telefono rosa e ideato da Annamaria Barbato Ricci, è arrivato in libreria (Castelvecchi editore).

Contributo al femminile per i 150 anni dell’Unità d’Italia: quindici ritratti di donne che, nel tempo, hanno lasciato la loro impronta nei campi della politica, della cultura e delle scienze. Scritti da autrici da sempre attente ai saperi delle donne tra cui Sandra Artom, Marta Aiò, Brunella Schisa, Danila Comastri Montanari, giornaliste come Laura Delli Colli e specialiste come Maria Rita Parsi. I proventi del libro, già un successo grazie al porta a porta messo in moto dalle lettrici, saranno devoluti al Telefono rosa, l’Associazione che da oltre vent’anni si dedica all’assistenza delle donne che subiscono ogni genere di soprusi e che, per Le Italiane, ha raccontato il capitolo dedicato alle 21 protagoniste della Costituente nel 1947. Iniziativa che cade in contemporanea con la giornata internazionale contro la violenza sulle donne, fenomeno in costante aumento nel nostro Paese.

AC                                              LibOn.it

 

Fonte: Repubblica.it

Elsa Morante, 25 anni dalla morte II

26 novembre 2010

Elsa Morante moriva 25 anni fa (18 agosto 1912, 25 novembre 1985).

Ecco la bibliografia della grande scrittrice sposa (dell’altrettanto grande Alberto Moravia), su LiBon.it:

  • Alibi, poesie, Torino, Einaudi, 1958

AC LibOn.it

Elsa Morante, 25 anni dalla morte

26 novembre 2010

Elsa Morante moriva 25 anni fa.

Radio3 ricorderà la grande scrittrice a partire da sabato 20 novembre.

AC                                                LiBon.it

 

 

Sulla lingua del tempo presente, Gustavo Zagrebelsky

26 novembre 2010

Sulla lingua del tempo presente. La lingua del potere nell’Italia di oggi. Undici parole per Lui posson bastare.

Scendere in politica: da uno stadio superiore (l’azienda) a uno inferiore (la politica). Contratto con gli elettori (devoti): concetto mediato dalla dimensione imprenditoriale e commerciale e trasportato nella dimensione pubblica e statale della politica . Amore fra colleghi e persone della stessa fazione: intromissione nella sfera intima e sentimentale. Doni del capo, ai sottomessi. Mantenuti: tutti coloro che non hanno conseguito fortuna (la fortuna del capo). Popolo: coacervo di persone sottostanti tutte uguali, o, perlomeno, moltitudine omologata. E ancora: le tasche degli italiani, ovvero un luogo intoccabile arrivato a essere tabù; politicamente corretto, categoria tanto più generica quanto più stringente e imperante nel gergo pubblico.

Gustavo Zagrebelsky studia il tempo in cui viviamo vivisezionandone la lingua; o meglio, analizzando alcune decine di parole di uno dei suoi principali protagonisti e “padroni”.

Come antecedente della sua fatica Zagrebelsky ha assunto la ricerca del celebre filologo ebreo-tedesco, Viktor Klemperer, che dedicò nel 1947, a guerra da poco conclusa, un saggio sull’idioma del Terzo Reich, da lui definito alla latina Lingua Terzii Imperii. L’argomento di Zagrebelsky è certo meno bieco, ma può dircela lunga sui tempi che viviamo. I quali si impongono alla nostra attenzione con il timbro vocale di chi ci governa e sommerge di parole.

AC                                                         LibOn.it

Fonte: Repubblica, Cultura, pag. 41, mercoledì 17 novembre 2010

Accordo con Nati per Leggere

25 novembre 2010

Nati per Leggere è un progetto nazionale senza fini di lucro che sostiene e promuove la lettura ad alta voce ai bambini di età compresa tra i 6 mesi e i 6 anni.

Recenti ricerche scientifiche dimostrano come il leggere ad alta voce, con una certa continuità, ai bambini in età prescolare abbia una positiva influenza sia dal punto di vista relazionale (è una opportunità di relazione tra bambino e genitori), che cognitivo (si sviluppano meglio e più precocemente la comprensione del linguaggio e la capacità di lettura). Inoltre si consolida nel bambino l’abitudine a leggere che si protrae nelle età successive grazie all’approccio precoce legato alla relazione.

Attraverso la collaborazione con Nati per Leggere LibOn.it si propone di sviluppare la propria presenza sul mercato dell’editoria per l’infanzia e nel contempo di offrire supporto e promozione al progetto, contribuendo inoltre, grazie alla vendita online e alla spedizione gratuita, a incrementare la diffusione e la reperibilità, anche nei centri non serviti dalla normale distribuzione libraria, dei libri selezionati da NpL.

LibOn.it propone una sezione dedicata al progetto con la selezione dei migliori libri per bambini tra i 6 mesi e i 6 anni, scelti e raccomandati da Nati per Leggere e una vetrina dedicata ai libri in lingua dove troverete bibliografie di libri nelle principali lingue (USA, UK, Spagna, Francia, Germania, ecc) e le novità in commercio.
Tutti i libri segnalati potranno essere acquistati online senza nessuna spesa di spedizione.

Per saperne di più sul progetto Nati per Leggere: www.natiperleggere.it

Saul Bellow, “Letters”

23 novembre 2010

Letters, il memoir inedito del premio Nobel per la Letteratura Saul Bellow. Eccolo su Libon.it.

«Era un uomo incapace di mettere radici, che cominciava ogni nuova famiglia, come fosse un nuovo libro - teorizza il critico letterario Benjamin Markovitz -, fino a che non è stato troppo stanco e vecchio per ripartire da zero».

Quando l’ editore lo spronò a scrivere la propria autobiografia, Saul Bellow rispose «non ho nulla da dire, a parte il fatto di essere stato insopportabilmente impegnato dal giorno in cui fui circonciso». Cinque anni e mezzo dopo la sua morte, due mesi prima del suo novantesimo compleanno, Viking dà alle stampe l’ inedito memoir postumo del Nobel per la letteratura: Saul Bellow Letters, una raccolta, curata da Benjamin Taylor, di ben 708 lettere scritte dall’ autore di Herzog e Ravelstein nell’ arco di 72 anni.

Tra le lettere più belle vi sono quelle inviate agli amici scrittori: Faulkner, Ellison, Amis, Malamud, Cheever. Nonostante l’ enorme differenza di stile e di retaggio culturale, Bellow nutriva un profondo affetto-stima per l’ autore di Falconer, suo contemporaneo. «Da quando ci siamo parlati al telefono, ho pensato senza sosta a te» gli rivela nel dicembre 1981, dopo aver appreso che Cheever era gravemente malato. Con gli scrittori della generazione successiva, – Philip Roth, Cynthia Ozick e Stanley Elkin – Bellow accetta riluttante il ruolo di «maestro».

AC                                                      Libon.it

 

Fonte: Corriere.it


USA Bestsellers Books: 12-19 Novembre 2010

19 novembre 2010

La lista dei libri più venduti in U.S.A.  Settimana dal 12 al 19 Novembre 2010.

Eccoli su Libon.it

FICTION

1. TOWERS OF MIDNIGHT, by Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson.

2. THE CONFESSION, by John Grisham. (Doubleday)

3. INDULGENCE IN DEATH, by J. D. Robb. (Putnam)

4. THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST, by Stieg Larsson. (Knopf)

5. AMERICAN ASSASSIN, by Vince Flynn. (Atria)

6. MOONLIGHT MILE, by Dennis Lehane. (Morrow/HarperCollins)

7. WORTH DYING FOR, by Lee Child. (Delacorte)

8. FALL OF GIANTS, by Ken Follett. (Dutton)

9. IN THE COMPANY OF OTHERS, by Jan Karon. (Viking)

10. SQUIRREL SEEKS CHIPMUNK, by David Sedaris. (Little, Brown)

11. SAFE HAVEN, by Nicholas Sparks. (Grand Central)

12. THE HELP, by Kathryn Stockett. (Amy Einhorn/Putnam

13. SIDE JOBS, by Jim Butcher. (Roc)

14. EDGE, by Jeffery Deaver. (Simon & Schuster)

15. FREEDOM, by Jonathan Franzen. (Farrar, Straus & Giroux)

NONFICTION

1. LIFE, by Keith Richards with James Fox. (Little, Brown)

2. BROKE, by Glenn Beck and Kevin Balfe. (Threshold/Mercury Radio Arts)

3. UNBEARABLE LIGHTNESS, by Portia de Rossi. (Atria)

4. EARTH (THE BOOK), by Jon Stewart and others. (Grand Central)

5.  ME, by Ricky Martin. (Celebra)

6. THEY CALL ME BABA BOOEY, by Gary Dell’Abate with Chad Millman. (Spiegel & Grau)

7. THE LAST BOY, by Jane Leavy. (Harper/HarperCollins)

8. IN FIFTY YEARS WE’LL ALL BE CHICKS, by Adam Carolla. (Crown Archetype)

9. AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF MARK TWAIN, VOL. 1, by Mark Twain. (University of California)

10. PINHEADS AND PATRIOTS, by Bill O’Reilly. (Morrow/HarperCollins)
11.CLEOPATRA, by Stacy Schiff. (Little, Brown)
12. —— FINISH FIRST, by Tucker Max. (Gallery)
13. AT HOME, by Bill Bryson. (Doubleday)
14. TRICKLE UP POVERTY, by Michael Savage. (Morrow/HarperCollins)
15. MY DAD SAYS, by Justin Halpern. (It Books/HarperCollins)

AC                                                  Libon.it

Fonte: New York Times.com

Le classifiche riflettono la vendite nazionali della settimana 3-9 Ottobre 2010 e includono i rivenditori indipendenti e le catene.

Libri più letti in Francia: dal 12 al 19 novembre 2010

19 novembre 2010

Più venduti in Francia.  12-19 novembre 2010:

Eccoli su Libon.it

1. La carte et le territoire, Michel Houellebecq

2. Largo Winch, t. 17 : Mer Noire, Jean Van Hamme, Philippe Francq

3. Naruto, vol. 51, Masashi Kishimoto

4. La première nuit, Marc Levy

5. Un lieu incertain, Fred Vargas

6. Rappelle-moi, Michel Drucker

7. 3 096 jours, Natascha Kampusch

8. Lucky Luke contre Pinkerton : nouvelles aventures, Daniel Pennac, Tonino Benacquista, Achdé, Morris

9. Le métronome illustré, Lorànt Deutsch

10. Le petit Spirou, vol. 15 : Tiens-toi droit !, Tome, Janry

AC                                                   Libon.it

Fonte: Livres Hebdo

National Book Awards: i vincitori

19 novembre 2010

 

I vincitori del National Book Awards 2010. Trovali su Libon.it.

 

Fiction:

Jaimy Gordon, Lord of Misrule (McPherson & Co.)

 

Non Fiction:

Patti Smith, Just Kids (Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers)

 

Poetry:

Terrance Hayes, Lighthead (Penguin Books)

 

Young People’s Literature:

Kathryn Erskine, Mockingbird

 

 

AC                                                   Libon.it

 

Fonte: Nationalbook.org